Archive for the ‘dinosaurs’ Category

Desert Dinosaurs   Leave a comment

 

 

On Sunday, April 27, 2014 James St. Andre and I set out on a trip to Los Angeles to visit my friend Mark Anthony. It is about a 400 mile drive through the desert between Phoenix and L.A. James has only recently gotten his driver’s licesnse, and I told him he could have some treats: driving across the Colorado River, passing through Desert Center, and maybe we would see dinosaurs. We stopped for lunch in Indio and I took over the driving again. In a few minutes James indicated he needed a break, so I looked for the next place to get off the freeway. The exit said Cabazon. I pulled off and headed for:

 

Burger King, one of our favorite fast food places. I spotted it from the freeway.

Burger King, one of our favorite fast food places. I spotted it from the freeway.

I found a place to park  We were just across the highway from:

San Jacinto Peak

San Jacinto Peak

 

James went inside. I looked around and this is what I found.

 

Wow! It's a dinosaur, of the kind we used to call Brontosaurus before we learned that brontosaurs never existed and were actually apatosaurs.

Wow! It’s a dinosaur, of the kind we used to call Brontosaurus before we learned that brontosaurs never existed and were actually apatosaurs.

 

By sheer luck I had pulled off the freeway where the dinosaurs hang out. They are not visible from I-10.  I remembered them from trips taken long ago when they could be seen from the highway. I had never actually stopped to look at them on any of those earlier  excursions. But, James was taking his time so I wandered around, and this is what I saw.

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Does this guy look a bit nervous to you?

 

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Yikes, it Tyrannosaurus Rex, and I think he looks happy to see me.

 

Taller than a palm tree with small front arm/legs. Lord of all he surveys. Bigger really is Better.

Taller than a palm tree with small front arm/legs. Lord of all he surveys. Bigger really is Better.

Wait a minute! What kind of brontosaur has an observation platform?

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This guy must be domesticated. He also provides shade and a picnic area!

That’s great! Who wouldn’t want to eat their burgers in the shade of a bronto? Sure is a lot of room back here. I wonder if there is anything else . . .

Sure enough! There is more.  It's like a sign from God that she wants me to see more dinosaurs.

Sure enough! There is more. It’s like a sign from God that she wants me to see more dinosaurs.

 

Look out, kid!

Look out, kid!

I sneaked past the hungry head and found . . .

something very tall.

something very tall.

 

This guy was so big, and in an enclosed space, that I couldn’t get all of him into one shot.

 

He looks a lot like the brontosaur up front, but the apatosaur probably looked more like this.

He looks a lot like the brontosaur up front, but the apatosaur probably looked more like this.

 

Aw, isn't that cute? The big thunder lizard has a pet. Actually crocodiles go back as far in time as dinosaurs--they just didn't evolve into something different or die out because of meteor strikes.

Aw, isn’t that cute? The big thunder lizard has a pet. Actually crocodiles go back as far in time as dinosaurs–they just didn’t evolve into something different or die out because of meteor strikes.

 

There are signs of man in this lost world. Is that dinosaur ahead inside a building?

There are signs of man in this lost world. Is that dinosaur ahead inside a building?

The trail led up into the unknown. What? Tickets? Professor Challenger didn't have to buy tickets when he explored the Lost Land!

The trail led up into the unknown. What? Tickets? Professor Challenger didn’t have to buy tickets when he explored the Lost Land!

I went as far as I could go and looked into a jungle I don't think I will ever explore.

I went as far as I could go and looked into a jungle I don’t think I will ever explore.

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Well, I couldn’t abandon James entirely. I headed back to Burger King Land.

 

I am the Trollgod, and I am not afraid of giant dinosaurs. Anyway, I had to protect this kid from being eaten. I had to do it without my headpiece because the wind was so strong a hat would have blown away.

I am the Trollgod, and I am not afraid of giant dinosaurs. Anyway, I had to protect this kid from being eaten. I had to do it without my headpiece because the wind was so strong a hat would have blown away.

 

Selfie: Trollgod walks under giant dinosaur.

Selfie: Trollgod walks under giant dinosaur.

 

Is this a trophy shot, or just me stepping on toes again? Bwa ha ha ha  ha ha!

Is this a trophy shot, or just me stepping on toes again? Bwa ha ha ha ha ha!

 

The brontosaur is hollow, and has a store in her tummy. James had joined me by now. The kid just isn't impressed by anything. :D

The brontosaur is hollow, and has a store in her tummy. James had joined me by now. The kid just isn’t impressed by anything.

 

It is a very cool shop. Alas, the trollcave is cluttered enough, and no new trophies were acquired.

It is a very cool shop. Alas, the trollcave is cluttered enough, and no new trophies were acquired.

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We said goodbye to the prehistoric world and jumped back in the car to continue with the adventure. Now that I know how to find the place, I may go back some day just to finish exploring the Land of the Dinosaurs.

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If you have ever been up close with a dinosaur, why not leave a comment?

–end

 

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Thun’da   1 comment

I’ve been a Tarzan fan since I was 10 years old and first heard Johnny Weismuller’s unearthly jungle yodels.  If you’re a Tarzan fan, you sort of become a fan of all the other imitation Tarzans, and one of the best imitations was Frank Frazetta’s Thun’da, King of the Congo.

Dynamite Comics retells the story of Thun’da, King of the Lost Land.

Gardner Fox and Frank Frazetta created Thun’da in 1952.  American aviator Roger Drum crashes in the heart of Africa only to find himself in a place like Burroughs’ Pal-ul-don, a land full of mammoths, saber-toothed tigers, ape-men, and even some left-over dinosaurs. Although fit when he started, the rigorous life of survival in this savage world turned Drum into a paragon of physical perfection.  Of course he soon met a beautiful jungle queen, and found himself elevated to the status of jungle god.  He got his name from the sound his pistol made when he was slaying a gigantic serpent–the sound of thunder.

In August of 2012 Dynamite Comics, re-packagers of every pulp hero they can get their hands on, relaunched the Thund’da comics. Written by Robert Place Napton with art by Cliff Richards and covers by Jae Lee, they tell the story as if it was happening now instead of the World War II setting originally envisioned by Gardner Fox.  Today’s comics are more gorgeous than those of yesteryear, and move a lot slower. Napton uses 22 pages to start building the character of Thun’da and gets about as far as Fox did in his first 2 pages of story.  But, it’s the same story.

Dynamite has done something that I really want to praise them for.  They reprinted the first 10 page Thun’da story in the back of the book.  Although I knew Thun’da existed, I had never actually read any of his stories.  The Frazetta artwork of the original is clean and beautiful, and doesn’t waste any time on psychological character development.  Roger Drum just naturally adjusts to being a lord of the jungle in the original, slaying ape-men and savage beasts with ease.

These covers are all symbolic. Nothing like this happens in the actual comic.

The 22 pages of retelling in the second issue gets us through pages 3 and 4 of the original 10-page tale.  We can see the ratio now.  The modern retelling of Thun’da is ten times as long as the original.  This is a nice formula.  Take some classic pulp story and retell it in the present, but make it ten times as long and detailed as the original.  No need to worry about plot–the original tale does the plotting for you.  All you as a writer need to do is fill in lots of details that help get from point A to point B in the story.  Napton does this extremely well and the comics are just beautiful.  Still, it seems a bit wrong to me that I’m paying 30 times as much today as I would have in 1952 for 1/10 of the actual story content.  This makes the ratio of money to story an incredible 300 to 1 compared to what a kid could have gotten in 1952.  The second issue of the new Thun’da reprints a 7 page story from the 50s.

Well, I’m hooked.  Cliff Richards’ art is excellent.  His monsters and jungle beasts are especially fine.  These comics are everything comics should be–well drawn, colorful, and exciting.  And the reprints are making me think about finding the Thun’da archive publication that came out in 2010 and buying it.  The original Frazetta art is mighty fine in its own right, and nobody was better at pulp adventure storytelling than Gardner Fox.

In my not so humble opinion, Dynamite has become the best comic book publisher in the country over the last few years, and they have done it by going back to the classics and retelling stories of high adventure that today’s readers were too young to read when they first came out.  I love it.

If you like Frank Frazetta, Gardner Fox, Cliff Richards or Robert Napton, feel free to leave a comment.

–end